jolt


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Jolt \Jolt\, n.
   1. A sudden shock or jerk; a jolting motion, as in a carriage
      moving over rough ground.
      [1913 Webster]

            The first jolt had like to have shaken me out.
                                                  --Swift.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A physical or psychological shock; see jolt v. t. senses
      2 and 3; as, the stock market plunge was a big jolt to his
      sense of affluence; he touched the casing of the
      ungrounded motor and got a jolt from a short inside.
      [PJC]

   3. Something which causes a jolt[2]; as, the bad news was a
      jolt.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Jolt \Jolt\ (j[=o]lt), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Jolted; p. pr. &
   vb. n. Jolting.] [Prob. fr. jole, joll, jowl, and orig.
   meaning, to knock on the head. See Jowl.]
   To shake with short, abrupt risings and fallings, as a
   carriage moving on rough ground; as, the coach jolts.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Jolt \Jolt\, v. t.
   1. To cause to move with a sudden motion, especially an up
      and down motion, as in a carriage going over rough ground,
      or on a high-trotting horse; as, the horse jolts the
      rider; fast driving jolts the carriage and the passengers.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To stun or shock a person physically, as with a blow or
      electrical shock; as, the earthquake jolted him out of
      bed.
      [PJC]

   3. To stun or shock or change the mental state of (a person)
      suddenly, as if with a blow; as, the sight of the house on
      fire jolted him into action; his mother's early death
      jolted his idyllic happiness.
      [PJC]
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