junket


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Junket \Jun"ket\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Junketed; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Junketing.]
   To give entertainment to; to feast.
   [1913 Webster]

         The good woman took my lodgings over my head, and was
         in such a hurry to junket her neighbors. --Walpole.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Junket \Jun"ket\, n. [Formerly also juncate, fr. It. giuncata
   cream cheese, made in a wicker or rush basket, fr. L. juncus
   a rush. See 2d Junk, and cf. Juncate.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. A cheese cake; a sweetmeat; any delicate food.
      [1913 Webster]

            How Faery Mab the junkets eat.        --Milton.
      [1913 Webster]

            Victuals varied well in taste,
            And other junkets.                    --Chapman.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A feast; an entertainment.
      [1913 Webster]

            A new jaunt or junket every night.    --Thackeray.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. A trip made at the expense of an organization of which the
      traveller is an official, ostensibly to obtain information
      relevant to one's duties; especially, a trip made by a
      public official at government expense. The term is
      sometimes used opprobriously, from a belief that such
      trips are often taken for private pleasure, and are
      therefore a waste of public money; as, a congressional
      junket to a tropical country.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Junket \Jun"ket\, v. i.
   To feast; to banquet; to make an entertainment; -- sometimes
   applied opprobriously to feasting by public officers at the
   public cost.
   [1913 Webster]

         Job's children junketed and feasted together often.
                                                  --South.
   [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form