kin


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

-kin \-kin\ (-k[i^]n) suff. [Of Low German origin; cf. G. -chen,
   LG. -- ken.]
   A diminutive suffix; as, manikin; lambkin.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Kin \Kin\ (k[i^]n), n. (Mus.)
   A primitive Chinese instrument of the cittern kind, with from
   five to twenty-five silken strings. --Riemann.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Kin \Kin\, n. [OE. kin, cun, AS. cynn kin, kind, race, people;
   akin to cennan to beget, D. kunne sex, OS. & OHG. kunni kin,
   race, Icel. kyn, Goth. kuni, G. & D. kind a child, L. genus
   kind, race, L. gignere to beget, Gr. gi`gnesqai to be born,
   Skr. jan to beget. [root]44. Cf. Kind, King, Gender
   kind, Nation.]
   1. Relationship, consanguinity, or affinity; connection by
      birth or marriage; kindred; near connection or alliance,
      as of those having common descent.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Relatives; persons of the same family or race.
      [1913 Webster]

            The father, mother, and the kin beside. --Dryden.
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            You are of kin, and so a friend to their persons.
                                                  --Bacon.
      [1913 Webster] Kin
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Kin \Kin\ (k[i^]n), n. Also Kine \Kine\ (k[imac]n). [Gr. kinei^n
   to move.] (Physics)
   The unit velocity in the C. G. S. system -- a velocity of one
   centimeter per second.
   [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Kin \Kin\, a.
   Of the same nature or kind; kinder. "Kin to the king."
   --Shak.
   [1913 Webster]
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