land


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Land \Land\ (l[a^]nd), n.
   Urine. See Lant. [Obs.]
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Land \Land\, n. [AS. land, lond; akin to D., G., Icel., Sw.,
   Dan., and Goth. land. ]
   1. The solid part of the surface of the earth; -- opposed to
      water as constituting a part of such surface, especially
      to oceans and seas; as, to sight land after a long voyage.
      [1913 Webster]

            They turn their heads to sea, their sterns to land.
                                                  --Dryden.
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   2. Any portion, large or small, of the surface of the earth,
      considered by itself, or as belonging to an individual or
      a people, as a country, estate, farm, or tract.
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            Go view the land, even Jericho.       --Josh. ii. 1.
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            Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey,
            Where wealth accumulates and men decay. --Goldsmith.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Land \Land\, v. i.
   1. To come to the end of a course; to arrive at a
      destination, literally or figuratively; as, he landed in
      trouble; after hithchiking for a week, he landed in Los
      Angeles.
      [1913 Webster +PJC]

   2. Specifically: To go on shore from a ship or boat; to
      disembark.
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   3. Specifically: To reach and come to rest on land after
      having been in the air; as, the arrow landed in a flower
      bed; the golf ball landed in a sand trap; our airplane
      landed in Washington.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Land \Land\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Landed; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Landing.]
   1. To set or put on shore from a ship or other water craft;
      to disembark; to debark.
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            I 'll undertake to land them on our coast. --Shak.
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   2. To catch and bring to shore; to capture; as, to land a
      fish.
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   3. To set down after conveying; to cause to fall, alight, or
      reach; to bring to the end of a course; as, he landed the
      quoit near the stake; to be thrown from a horse and landed
      in the mud; to land one in difficulties or mistakes.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. Specifically: (Aeronautics) To pilot (an airplane) from
      the air onto the land; as, to land the plane on a highway.
      [PJC]
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