liberty of the yard


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Yard \Yard\, n. [OE. yard, yerd, AS. geard; akin to OFries.
   garda garden, OS. gardo garden, gard yard, D. gaard garden,
   G. garten, OHG. garto garden, gari inclosure, Icel. gar[eth]r
   yard, house, Sw. g[*a]rd, Dan. gaard, Goth. gards a house,
   garda sheepfold, L. hortus garden, Gr. cho`rtos an inclosure.
   Cf. Court, Garden, Garth, Horticulture, Orchard.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. An inclosure; usually, a small inclosed place in front of,
      or around, a house or barn; as, a courtyard; a cowyard; a
      barnyard.
      [1913 Webster]

            A yard . . . inclosed all about with sticks
            In which she had a cock, hight chanticleer.
                                                  --Chaucer.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. An inclosure within which any work or business is carried
      on; as, a dockyard; a shipyard.
      [1913 Webster]

   Liberty of the yard, a liberty, granted to persons
      imprisoned for debt, of walking in the yard, or within any
      other limits prescribed by law, on their giving bond not
      to go beyond those limits.

   Prison yard, an inclosure about a prison, or attached to
      it.

   Yard grass (Bot.), a low-growing grass (Eleusine Indica)
      having digitate spikes. It is common in dooryards, and
      like places, especially in the Southern United States.
      Called also crab grass.

   Yard of land. See Yardland.
      [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form