lied


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lie \Lie\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Lied (l[imac]d); p. pr. & vb.
   n. Lying (l[imac]"[i^]ng).] [OE. lien, li[yogh]en,
   le[yogh]en, leo[yogh]en, AS. le['o]gan; akin to D. liegen,
   OS. & OHG. liogan, G. l["u]gen, Icel. lj[=u]ga, Sw. ljuga,
   Dan. lyve, Goth. liugan, Russ. lgate.]
   To utter falsehood with an intention to deceive; to say or do
   that which is intended to deceive another, when he a right to
   know the truth, or when morality requires a just
   representation.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lied \Lied\ (l[=e]t), n.; pl. Lieder (l[=e]"d[~e]r). [G.]
   (Mus.)
   A lay; a German song. It differs from the French chanson,
   and the Italian canzone, all three being national.
   [1913 Webster]

         The German Lied is perhaps the most faithful reflection
         of the national sentiment.               --Grove.
   [1913 Webster]
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