malign


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

malign \ma*lign"\, a. [L. malignus, for maligenus, i. e., of a
   bad kind or nature; malus bad + the root of genus birth,
   race, kind: cf. F. malin, masc., maligne, fem. See Malice,
   Gender, and cf. Benign, Malignant.]
   1. Having an evil disposition toward others; harboring
      violent enmity; malevolent; malicious; spiteful; --
      opposed to benign.
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            Witchcraft may be by operation of malign spirits.
                                                  --Bacon.
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   2. Unfavorable; unpropitious; pernicious; tending to injure;
      as, a malign aspect of planets.
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   3. Malignant; as, a malign ulcer. [R.] --Bacon.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Malign \Ma*lign"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Maligned; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Maligning.] [Cf. L. malignare. See Malign, a.]
   To treat with malice; to show hatred toward; to abuse; to
   wrong; to injure. [Obs.]
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         The people practice what mischiefs and villainies they
         will against private men, whom they malign by stealing
         their goods, or murdering them.          --Spenser.
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   2. To speak great evil of; to traduce; to defame; to slander;
      to vilify; to asperse.
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            To be envied and shot at; to be maligned standing,
            and to be despised falling.           --South.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Malign \Ma*lign"\, v. i.
   To entertain malice. [Obs.]
   [1913 Webster] Malignance
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