maneuver


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Maneuver \Ma*neu"ver\, Manoeuvre \Ma*noeu"vre\, v. i. [imp. & p.
   p. Maneuveredor Manoeuvred; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Maneuvering, or Manoeuvring.] [Cf. F. manoeuvrer. See
   Maneuver, n.]
   1. To perform a movement or movements in military or naval
      tactics; to make changes in position with the intention of
      getting an advantage in attack or defense.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Hence: To make changes in one's approach to solving a
      problem, so as to achieve maximum advantage in a changing
      situation; -- used especially in competitive situations,
      as in politics, diplomacy, or sports.
      [PJC]

   3. To manage with address or art; to scheme.
      [1913 Webster] Maneuver
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Maneuver \Ma*neu"ver\, Manoeuvre \Ma*noeu"vre\, v. t.
   1. To change the positions of, as of troops of ships.
      [1913 Webster] Maneuverer
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Maneuver \Ma*neu"ver\, Manoeuvre \Ma*noeu"vre\, n. [F.
   manoeuvre, OF. manuevre, LL. manopera, lit., hand work,
   manual labor; L. manus hand + opera, fr. opus work. See
   Manual, Operate, and cf. Mainor, Manure.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. Management; dexterous movement; specif., a military or
      naval evolution, movement, or change of position.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Management with address or artful design; adroit
      proceeding; stratagem.
      [1913 Webster] Maneuver
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