mine


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Mine \Mine\, v. i. [F. miner, L. minare to drive animals, in LL.
   also, to lead, conduct, dig a mine (cf. E. lode, and lead to
   conduct), akin to L. minari to threaten; cf. Sp. mina mine,
   conduit, subterraneous canal, a spring or source of water,
   It. mina. See Menace, and cf. Mien.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. To dig a mine or pit in the earth; to get ore, metals,
      coal, or precious stones, out of the earth; to dig in the
      earth for minerals; to dig a passage or cavity under
      anything in order to overthrow it by explosives or
      otherwise.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To form subterraneous tunnel or hole; to form a burrow or
      lodge in the earth; as, the mining cony.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Mine \Mine\ (m[=e]n), n. [F.]
   See Mien. [Obs.]
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Mine \Mine\ (m[imac]n), pron. & a. [OE. min, fr. AS. m[imac]n;
   akin to D. mijn, OS., OFries., & OHG. m[imac]n, G. mein, Sw.
   & Dan. min, Icel. minn, Goth. meins my, mine, meina of me,
   and E. me. [root]187. See Me, and cf. My.]
   Belonging to me; my. Used as a pronominal to me; my. Used as
   a pronominal adjective in the predicate; as, "Vengeance is
   mine; I will repay." --Rom. xii. 19. Also, in the old style,
   used attributively, instead of my, before a noun beginning
   with a vowel.
   [1913 Webster]

         I kept myself from mine iniquity.        --Ps. xviii.
                                                  23.
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   Note: Mine is often used absolutely, the thing possessed
         being understood; as, his son is in the army, mine in
         the navy.
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               When a man deceives me once, says the Italian
               proverb, it is his fault; when twice, it is mine.
                                                  --Bp. Horne.
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               This title honors me and mine.     --Shak.
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               She shall have me and mine.        --Shak.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Mine \Mine\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mined; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Mining.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. To dig away, or otherwise remove, the substratum or
      foundation of; to lay a mine under; to sap; to undermine;
      hence, to ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means.
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            They mined the walls.                 --Hayward.
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            Too lazy to cut down these immense trees, the
            spoilers . . . had mined them, and placed a quantity
            of gunpowder in the cavity.           --Sir W.
                                                  Scott.
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   2. To dig into, for ore or metal.
      [1913 Webster]

            Lead veins have been traced . . . but they have not
            been mined.                           --Ure.
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   3. To get, as metals, out of the earth by digging.
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            The principal ore mined there is the bituminous
            cinnabar.                             --Ure.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Mine \Mine\, n. [F., fr. LL. mina. See Mine, v. i.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. A subterranean cavity or passage; especially:
      (a) A pit or excavation in the earth, from which metallic
          ores, precious stones, coal, or other mineral
          substances are taken by digging; -- distinguished from
          the pits from which stones for architectural purposes
          are taken, and which are called quarries.
      (b) (Mil.) A cavity or tunnel made under a fortification
          or other work, for the purpose of blowing up the
          superstructure with some explosive agent.
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   2. Any place where ore, metals, or precious stones are got by
      digging or washing the soil; as, a placer mine.
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   3. (Fig.): A rich source of wealth or other good. --Shak.
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   4. (Mil.) An explosive device placed concealed in a location,
      on land or at sea, where an enemy vehicle or enemy
      personnel may pass through, having a triggering mechanism
      which detects people or vehicles, and which will explode
      and kill or maim personnel or destroy or damage vehicles.
      A mine placed at sea (formerly called a torpedo, see
      torpedo[2]
      (a) ) is also called an marine mine and underwater mine
          and sometimes called a floating mine, even though it
          may be anchored to the floor of the sea and not
          actually float freely. A mine placed on land (formerly
          called a torpedo, see torpedo[3]), usually buried,
          is called a land mine.
          [PJC]

   Mine dial, a form of magnetic compass used by miners.

   Mine pig, pig iron made wholly from ore; in distinction
      from cinder pig, which is made from ore mixed with forge
      or mill cinder.

   gold mine
      (a) a mine where gold is obtained.
      (b) (Fig.) a rich source of wealth or other good; same as
          Mine 3. --Raymond.
          [1913 Webster]
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