neuter


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Neuter \Neu"ter\, a. [L., fr. ne not + uter whether; akin to E.
   whether. See No, and Whether, and cf. Neither.]
   1. Neither the one thing nor the other; on neither side;
      impartial; neutral. [Archaic]
      [1913 Webster]

            In all our undertakings God will be either our
            friend or our enemy; for Providence never stands
            neuter.                               --South.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. (Gram.)
      (a) Having a form belonging more especially to words which
          are not appellations of males or females; expressing
          or designating that which is of neither sex; as, a
          neuter noun; a neuter termination; the neuter gender.
      (b) Intransitive; as, a neuter verb.
          [1913 Webster]

   3. (Biol.) Having no generative organs, or imperfectly
      developed ones; sexless. See Neuter, n., 3.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

neuter \neu"ter\, v. t.
   To render incapable of sexual reproduction; to remove or
   alter the sexual organs so as to make infertile; to alter; to
   fix; to desex; -- in male animals, to castrate; in female
   animals, to spay.
   [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Neuter \Neu"ter\, n.
   1. A person who takes no part in a contest; one who is either
      indifferent to a cause or forbears to interfere; a
      neutral.
      [1913 Webster]

            The world's no neuter; it will wound or save.
                                                  --Young.
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   2. (Gram.)
      (a) A noun of the neuter gender; any one of those words
          which have the terminations usually found in neuter
          words.
      (b) An intransitive verb.
          [1913 Webster]

   3. (Biol.) An organism, either vegetable or animal, which at
      its maturity has no generative organs, or but imperfectly
      developed ones, as a plant without stamens or pistils, as
      the garden Hydrangea; esp., one of the imperfectly
      developed females of certain social insects, as of the ant
      and the common honeybee, which perform the labors of the
      community, and are called workers.
      [1913 Webster]
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