north


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

North \North\ (n[^o]rth), n. [AS. nor[eth]; akin to D. noord,
   G., Sw., & Dan. nord, Icel. nor[eth]r. Cf. Norman,
   Norse.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. That one of the four cardinal points of the compass, at
      any place, which lies in the direction of the true
      meridian, and to the left hand of a person facing the
      east; the direction opposite to the south.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Any country or region situated farther to the north than
      another; the northern section of a country.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. Specifically: That part of the United States lying north
      of Mason and Dixon's line. See under Line.
      [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

North \North\, a.
   Lying toward the north; situated at the north, or in a
   northern direction from the point of observation or
   reckoning; proceeding toward the north, or coming from the
   north.
   [1913 Webster]

   North following. See Following, a., 2.

   North pole, that point in the heavens, or on the earth,
      ninety degrees from the equator toward the north.

   North preceding. See Following, a., 2.

   North star, the star toward which the north pole of the
      earth very nearly points, and which accordingly seems
      fixed and immovable in the sky. The star [alpha] (alpha)
      of the Little Bear, is our present north star, being
      distant from the pole about 1[deg] 25', and from year to
      year approaching slowly nearer to it. It is called also
      Cynosura, polestar, and by astronomers, Polaris.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

North \North\, v. i.
   To turn or move toward the north; to veer from the east or
   west toward the north.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

North \North\, adv.
   Northward.
   [1913 Webster]
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