obsess


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

obsess \ob*sess"\, v. t. [L. obsessus, p. p. of obsidere to
   besiege; ob (see Ob-) + sedere to sit.]
   1. To besiege; to beset. [archaic] --Sir T. Elyot.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To excessively preoccupy the thoughts or feelings of; to
      haunt the mind persistently.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

obsess \ob*sess"\, v. i.
   To be excessively or persistently preoccupied with something;
   -- usually used with on or over; as, to obsess over an
   imagined insult.
   [PJC]

         At all ages children are driven to figure out what it
         takes to succeed among their peers and to give these
         strategies precedence over anything their parents foist
         on them. Weary parents know they are no match for a
         child's peers, and rightly obsess over the best
         neighborhood in which to bring their children up.
                                                  --Steven
                                                  Pinker (How
                                                  the Mind
                                                  Works, p.
                                                  449-450
                                                  [1997]).
   [PJC]
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