occupy


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Occupy \Oc"cu*py\, v. i.
   1. To hold possession; to be an occupant. "Occupy till I
      come." --Luke xix. 13.
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   2. To follow business; to traffic.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Occupy \Oc"cu*py\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Occupied; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Occupying.] [OE. occupien, F. occuper, fr.L. occupare;
   ob (see Ob-) + a word akin to capere to take. See
   Capacious.]
   1. To take or hold possession of; to hold or keep for use; to
      possess.
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            Woe occupieth the fine [end] of our gladness.
                                                  --Chaucer.
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            The better apartments were already occupied. --W.
                                                  Irving.
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   2. To hold, or fill, the dimensions of; to take up the room
      or space of; to cover or fill; as, the camp occupies five
      acres of ground. --Sir J. Herschel.
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   3. To possess or use the time or capacity of; to engage the
      service of; to employ; to busy.
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            An archbishop may have cause to occupy more
            chaplains than six.                   --Eng. Statute
                                                  (Hen. VIII. )
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            They occupied themselves about the Sabbath. --2
                                                  Macc. viii.
                                                  27.
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   4. To do business in; to busy one's self with. [Obs.]
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            All the ships of the sea, with their mariners, were
            in thee to occupy the merchandise.    --Ezek. xxvii.
                                                  9.
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            Not able to occupy their old crafts.  --Robynson
                                                  (More's
                                                  Utopia).
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   5. To use; to expend; to make use of. [Obs.]
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            All the gold that was occupied for the work. --Ex.
                                                  xxxviii. 24.
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            They occupy not money themselves.     --Robynson
                                                  (More's
                                                  Utopia).
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   6. To have sexual intercourse with. [Obs.] --Nares.
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