parting


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Part \Part\ (p[aum]rt), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Parted; p. pr. &
   vb. n. Parting.] [F. partir, L. partire, partiri, p. p.
   partitus, fr. pars, gen. partis, a part. See Part, n.]
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   1. To divide; to separate into distinct parts; to break into
      two or more parts or pieces; to sever. "Thou shalt part it
      in pieces." --Lev. ii. 6.
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            There, [celestial love] parted into rainbow hues.
                                                  --Keble.
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   2. To divide into shares; to divide and distribute; to allot;
      to apportion; to share.
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            To part his throne, and share his heaven with thee.
                                                  --Pope.
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            They parted my raiment among them.    --John xix.
                                                  24.
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   3. To separate or disunite; to cause to go apart; to remove
      from contact or contiguity; to sunder.
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            The Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but
            death part thee and me.               --Ruth i. 17.
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            While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and
            carried up into heaven.               --Luke xxiv.
                                                  51.
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            The narrow seas that part
            The French and English.               --Shak.
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   4. Hence: To hold apart; to stand between; to intervene
      betwixt, as combatants.
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            The stumbling night did part our weary powers.
                                                  --Shak.
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   5. To separate by a process of extraction, elimination, or
      secretion; as, to part gold from silver.
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            The liver minds his own affair, . . .
            And parts and strains the vital juices. --Prior.
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   6. To leave; to quit. [Obs.]
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            Since presently your souls must part your bodies.
                                                  --Shak.
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   7. To separate (a collection of objects) into smaller
      collections; as, to part one's hair in the middle.
      [PJC]

   To part a cable (Naut.), to break it.

   To part company, to separate, as travelers or companions.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Parting \Par"ting\ (p[aum]rt"[i^]ng), a. [From Part, v.]
   1. Serving to part; dividing; separating.
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   2. Given when departing; as, a parting shot; a parting
      salute. "Give him that parting kiss." --Shak.
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   3. Departing. "Speed the parting guest." --Pope.
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   4. Admitting of being parted; partible.
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   Parting fellow, a partner. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

   Parting pulley. See under Pulley.

   Parting sand (Founding), dry, nonadhesive sand, sprinkled
      upon the partings of a mold to facilitate the separation.
      

   Parting strip (Arch.), in a sash window, one of the thin
      strips of wood let into the pulley stile to keep the
      sashes apart; also, the thin piece inserted in the window
      box to separate the weights.

   Parting tool (Mach.), a thin tool, used in turning or
      planing, for cutting a piece in two.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Parting \Par"ting\ (p[aum]rt"[i^]ng), n.
   1. The act of parting or dividing; the state of being parted;
      division; separation. "The parting of the way." --Ezek.
      xxi. 21.
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   2. A separation; a leave-taking. --Shak.
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            And there were sudden partings, such as press
            The life from out young hearts.       --Byron.
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   3. A surface or line of separation where a division occurs.
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   4. (Founding) The surface of the sand of one section of a
      mold where it meets that of another section.
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   5. (Chem.) The separation and determination of alloys; esp.,
      the separation, as by acids, of gold from silver in the
      assay button.
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   6. (Geol.) A joint or fissure, as in a coal seam.
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   7. (Naut.) The breaking, as of a cable, by violence.
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   8. (Min.) Lamellar separation in a crystallized mineral, due
      to some other cause than cleavage, as to the presence of
      twinning lamell[ae].
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