peak


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Peag \Peag\ (p[=e]g), n. [Written also peage, peak,
   peeke.] [Prob. of North American Indian origin, by
   shortening of wampumpeag. --RHUD.]
   A kind of aboriginal shell money, or wampum, of the Atlantic
   coast of the United States; -- originally applied only to
   polished white cylindrical beads. See also wampum.
   [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Peak \Peak\ (p[=e]k), n. [OE. pek, AS. peac, perh of Celtic
   origin; cf. Ir. peac a sharp-pointed thing. Cf. Pike.]
   1. A point; the sharp end or top of anything that terminates
      in a point; as, the peak, or front, of a cap. "Run your
      beard into a peak." --Beau. & Fl.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. The top, or one of the tops, of a hill, mountain, or
      range, ending in a point; often, the whole hill or
      mountain, esp. when isolated; as, the Peak of Teneriffe.
      [1913 Webster]

            Silent upon a peak in Darien.         --Keats.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. (Naut.)
      (a) The upper aftermost corner of a fore-and-aft sail; --
          used in many combinations; as, peak-halyards,
          peak-brails, etc.
      (b) The narrow part of a vessel's bow, or the hold within
          it.
      (c) The extremity of an anchor fluke; the bill. [In the
          last sense written also pea and pee.]
          [1913 Webster]

   Fore peak. (Naut.) See under Fore.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Peak \Peak\, v. t. (Naut.)
   To raise to a position perpendicular, or more nearly so; as,
   to peak oars, to hold them upright; to peak a gaff or yard,
   to set it nearer the perpendicular.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Peak \Peak\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Peaked (p[=e]kt); p. pr. &
   vb. n. Peaking.]
   1. To rise or extend into a peak or point; to form, or appear
      as, a peak.
      [1913 Webster]

            There peaketh up a mighty high mount. --Holand.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Hence: To achieve a maximum of numerical value, intensity
      of activity, popularity, or other characteristic, followed
      by a decline; as, the stock market peaked in January; his
      performance as a pitcher peaked in 1990; sales of the XTX
      model peaked at 20,000 per year.
      [PJC]

   3. To acquire sharpness of figure or features; hence, to look
      thin or sickly. "Dwindle, peak, and pine." --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. [Cf. Peek.] To pry; to peep slyly. [archaic] --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

   Peak arch (Arch.), a pointed or Gothic arch.
      [1913 Webster]
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