piping


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pipe \Pipe\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Piped; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Piping.]
   1. To perform, as a tune, by playing on a pipe, flute, fife,
      etc.; to utter in the shrill tone of a pipe.
      [1913 Webster]

            A robin . . . was piping a few querulous notes. --W.
                                                  Irving.
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   2. (Naut.) To call or direct, as a crew, by the boatswain's
      whistle.
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            As fine a ship's company as was ever piped aloft.
                                                  --Marryat.
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   3. To furnish or equip with pipes; as, to pipe an engine, or
      a building.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Piping \Pip"ing\ (p[imac]p"[i^]ng), a. [From Pipe, v.]
   1. Playing on a musical pipe. "Lowing herds and piping
      swains." --Swift.
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   2. Peaceful; favorable to, or characterized by, the music of
      the pipe rather than of the drum and fife. --Shak.
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   3. Emitting a high, shrill sound.
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   4. Simmering; boiling; sizzling; hissing; -- from the sound
      of boiling fluids.
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   Piping crow, Piping crow shrike, Piping roller (Zool.),
      any Australian bird of the genus Gymnorhina, esp.
      Gymnorhina tibicen, which is black and white, and the
      size of a small crow. Called also caruck.

   Piping frog (Zool.), a small American tree frog ({Hyla
      Pickeringii}) which utters a high, shrill note in early
      spring.

   Piping hot, boiling hot; hissing hot; very hot. [Colloq.]
      --Milton.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Piping \Pip"ing\, n.
   1. A small cord covered with cloth, -- used as trimming for
      women's dresses.
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   2. Pipes, collectively; as, the piping of a house.
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   3. The act of playing on a pipe; the shrill noted of birds,
      etc.
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   4. A piece cut off to be set or planted; a cutting; also,
      propagation by cuttings.
      [1913 Webster] Pipistrel
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

high-pitched \high-pitched\ adj.
   1. high in pitch or frequency; -- used of sounds and voices.
      Opposite of low. [Narrower terms: {adenoidal, pinched,
      nasal}; altissimo; alto; countertenor, alto;
      falsetto; peaky, spiky; piping; shrill, sharp;
      screaky, screechy, squeaking, squeaky, squealing;
      soprano, treble; sopranino; tenor]

   Syn: high.
        [WordNet 1.5]

   2. set at a sharp or high angle or slant; as, a high-pitched
      roof.

   Syn: steeply pitched, steep.
        [WordNet 1.5] high-power
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