poach


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Poach \Poach\, v. i.
   To steal or pocket game, or to carry it away privately, as in
   a bag; to kill or destroy game contrary to law, especially by
   night; to hunt or fish unlawfully; as, to poach for rabbits
   or for salmon.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Poach \Poach\, v. t. [Cf. OF. pocher to thrust or dig out with
   the fingers, to bruise (the eyes), F. pouce thumb, L. pollex,
   and also E. poach to cook eggs, to plunder, and poke to
   thrust against.]
   1. To stab; to pierce; to spear, as fish. [Obs.] --Carew.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To force, drive, or plunge into anything. [Obs.]
      [1913 Webster]

            His horse poching one of his legs into some hollow
            ground.                               --Sir W.
                                                  Temple.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. To make soft or muddy by trampling. --Tennyson.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. To begin and not complete. [Obs.] --Bacon.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Poach \Poach\ (p[=o]ch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Poached
   (p[=o]cht); p. pr. & vb. n. Poaching.] [F. pocher to place
   in a pocket, to poach eggs (the yolk of the egg being as it
   were pouched in the white), from poche pocket, pouch. See
   Pouch, v. & n.]
   1. To cook, as eggs, by breaking them into boiling water;
      also, to cook with butter after breaking in a vessel.
      --Bacon.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To rob of game; to pocket and convey away by stealth, as
      game; hence, to plunder. --Garth.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Poach \Poach\, v. i.
   To become soft or muddy.
   [1913 Webster]

         Chalky and clay lands . . . chap in summer, and poach
         in winter.                               --Mortimer.
   [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form