potter


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pother \Poth"er\, n. [Cf. D. peuteren to rummage, poke. Cf.
   Potter, Pudder.]
   Bustle; confusion; tumult; flutter; bother. [Written also
   potter, and pudder.] "What a pother and stir!" --Oldham.
   "Coming on with a terrible pother." --Wordsworth.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Potter \Pot"ter\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Pottered; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Pottering.] [Cf. W. pwtio to poke, or OD. poteren to
   search one thoroughly, Sw. p[*a]ta, peta, to pick, E. pother,
   put.]
   1. To busy one's self with trifles; to labor with little
      purpose, energy, of effect; to trifle; to putter; to
      pother.

   Syn: putter; pother.
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              Pottering about the Mile End cottages. --Mrs.
                                                  Humphry Ward.
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   2. To walk lazily or idly; to saunter.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Potter \Pot"ter\, n. [Cf. F. potier.]
   1. One whose occupation is to make earthen vessels. --Ps. ii.
      9.
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            The potter heard, and stopped his wheel.
                                                  --Longfellow.
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   2. One who hawks crockery or earthenware. [Prov. Eng.] --De
      Quincey.
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   3. One who pots meats or other eatables.
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   4. (Zool.) The red-bellied terrapin. See Terrapin.
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   Potter's asthma (Med.), emphysema of the lungs; -- so
      called because very prevalent among potters. --Parkers.

   Potter's clay. See under Clay.

   Potter's field, a public burial place, especially in a
      city, for paupers, unknown persons, and criminals; -- so
      named from the field south of Jerusalem, mentioned in
      --Matt. xxvii. 7.

   Potter's ore. See Alquifou.

   Potter's wheel, a horizontal revolving disk on which the
      clay is molded into form with the hands or tools. "My
      thoughts are whirled like a potter's wheel." --Shak.

   Potter wasp (Zool.), a small solitary wasp ({Eumenes
      fraternal}) which constructs a globular nest of mud and
      sand in which it deposits insect larv[ae], such as
      cankerworms, as food for its young.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Potter \Pot"ter\, v. t.
   To poke; to push; also, to disturb; to confuse; to bother.
   [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Terrapin \Ter"ra*pin\, n. [Probably of American Indian origin.]
   (Zool.)
   Any one of numerous species of tortoises living in fresh and
   brackish waters. Many of them are valued for food. [Written
   also terapin, terrapen, terrapene, turpen, and
   turapen.]
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   Note: The yellow-bellied terrapin (Pseudemys scabra) of the
         Southern United States, the red-bellied terrapin
         (Pseudemys rugosa or Chrysemys rubriventris),
         native of the tributaries Chesapeake Bay (called also
         potter, slider, and redfender), and the
         diamond-back or salt-marsh terrapin ({Malaclemmys
         palustris}), are the most important American species.
         The diamond-back terrapin is native of nearly the whole
         of the Atlantic coast of the United States.
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   Alligator terrapin, the snapping turtle.

   Mud terrapin, any one of numerous species of American
      tortoises of the genus Cinosternon.

   Painted terrapin, the painted turtle. See under Painted.
      

   Speckled terrapin, a small fresh-water American terrapin
      (Chelopus guttatus) having the carapace black with round
      yellow spots; -- called also spotted turtle.
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