pounce


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pounce \Pounce\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pounded; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Pouncing.]
   To sprinkle or rub with pounce; as, to pounce paper, or a
   pattern.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pounce \Pounce\, n. [Prob. through French, from an assumed LL.
   punctiare to prick, L. pungere, punctum. See Puncheon,
   Punch, v. t.]
   1. The claw or talon of a bird of prey. --Spenser. Burke.
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   2. A punch or stamp. [Obs.] "A pounce to print money with."
      --Withals.
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   3. Cloth worked in eyelet holes. [Obs.] --Homilies.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pounce \Pounce\, n. [F. ponce pumice, pounce, fr. L. pumex,
   -icis, pumice. See Pumice.]
   1. A fine powder, as of sandarac, or cuttlefish bone, --
      formerly used to prevent ink from spreading on manuscript.
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   2. Charcoal dust, or some other colored powder for making
      patterns through perforated designs, -- used by
      embroiderers, lace makers, etc.
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   Pounce box, a box for sprinkling pounce.

   Pounce paper, a transparent paper for tracing.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pounce \Pounce\, v. t.
   1. To strike or seize with the talons; to pierce, as with the
      talons. [Archaic]
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            Stooped from his highest pitch to pounce a wren.
                                                  --Cowper.
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            Now pounce him lightly,
            And as he roars and rages, let's go deeper. --J.
                                                  Fletcher.
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   2. To punch; to perforate; to stamp holes in, or dots on, by
      way of ornament. [Obs.] --Sir T. Elyot.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pounce \Pounce\, v. i.
   To fall suddenly and seize with the claws; -- with on or
   upon; as, a hawk pounces upon a chicken. Also used
   figuratively.
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         Derision is never so agonizing as when it pounces on
         the wanderings of misguided sensibility. --Jeffrey.
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