pound


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pound \Pound\, v. i.
   1. To strike heavy blows; to beat.
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   2. (Mach.) To make a jarring noise, as in running; as, the
      engine pounds.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pound \Pound\, n. [AS. pund an inclosure: cf. forpyndan to turn
   away, or to repress, also Icel. pynda to extort, torment, Ir.
   pont, pond, pound. Cf. Pinder, Pinfold, Pin to inclose,
   Pond.]
   1. An inclosure, maintained by public authority, in which
      cattle or other animals are confined when taken in
      trespassing, or when going at large in violation of law; a
      pinfold. --Shak.
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   2. A level stretch in a canal between locks.
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   3. (Fishing) A kind of net, having a large inclosure with a
      narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings
      spreading outward.
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   Pound covert, a pound that is close or covered over, as a
      shed.

   Pound overt, a pound that is open overhead.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pound \Pound\, v. t.
   To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound. --Milton.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pound \Pound\, n.; pl. Pounds, collectively Pound or
   Pounds. [AS. pund, fr. L. pondo, akin to pondus a weight,
   pendere to weigh. See Pendant.]
   1. A certain specified measure of mass or weight; especially,
      a legal standard consisting of an established number of
      ounces.
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   Note: The pound in general use in the United States and in
         England is the pound avoirdupois, which is divided
         into sixteen ounces, and contains 7,000 grains (0.453
         kilogram). The pound troy is divided into twelve
         ounces, and contains 5,760 grains. 144 pounds
         avoirdupois are equal to 175 pounds troy weight. See
         Avoirdupois, and Troy.
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   2. A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to
      twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about
      $4.86 in 1900 and $1.50 in 2002. The modern pound coin was
      introduced in 1983. Formerly there was a gold sovereign of
      the same value.
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   Note: The pound sterling was in Saxon times, about a. d. 671,
         a pound troy of silver, and a shilling was its
         twentieth part; consequently the latter was three times
         as large as it is at present. --Peacham.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pound \Pound\ (pound), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pounded; p. pr. &
   vb. n. Pounding.] [OE. pounen, AS. punian to bruise. Cf.
   Pun a play on words.]
   1. To strike repeatedly with some heavy instrument; to beat.
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            With cruel blows she pounds her blubbered cheeks.
                                                  --Dryden.
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   2. To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break
      into fine particles with a pestle or other heavy
      instrument; as, to pound spice or salt.
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