quash


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Quash \Quash\, v. i.
   To be shaken, or dashed about, with noise.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Quash \Quash\, n.
   Same as Squash.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Quash \Quash\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Quashed; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Quashing.] [OF. quasser, F. casser, fr. L. cassare to
   annihilate, annul, fr. cassus empty, vain, of uncertain
   origin. The word has been confused with L. quassare to shake,
   F. casser to break, which is probably of different origin.
   Cf. Cashier, v. t.] (Law)
   To abate, annul, overthrow, or make void; as, to quash an
   indictment. --Blackstone.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Quash \Quash\, v. t. [OF. quasser, F. casser, fr. L. quassare to
   shake, shatter, shiver, v. intens. fr. quatere, quassum, to
   shake, shatter. Cf. Concussion, Discuss, Rescue, and
   also Quash to annul.]
   1. To beat down, or beat in pieces; to dash forcibly; to
      crush.
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            The whales
            Against sharp rocks, like reeling vessels, quashed,
            Though huge as mountains, are in pieces dashed.
                                                  --Waller.
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   2. To crush; to subdue; to suppress or extinguish summarily
      and completely; as, to quash a rebellion.
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            Contrition is apt to quash or allay all worldly
            grief.                                --Barrow.
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