quench


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Quench \Quench\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Quenched; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Quenching.] [OE. quenchen, AS. cwencan in [=a]cwencan, to
   extinguish utterly, causative of cwincan, [=a]cwincan, to
   decrease, disappear; cf. AS. cw[imac]nan, [=a]cw[imac]nan, to
   waste or dwindle away.]
   1. To extinguish; to overwhelm; to make an end of; -- said of
      flame and fire, of things burning, and figuratively of
      sensations and emotions; as, to quench flame; to quench a
      candle; to quench thirst, love, hate, etc.
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            Ere our blood shall quench that fire. --Shak.
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            The supposition of the lady's death
            Will quench the wonder of her infamy. --Shak.
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   2. To cool suddenly, as heated steel, in tempering.
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   Syn: To extinguish; still; stifle; allay; cool; check.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Quench \Quench\, v. i.
   To become extinguished; to go out; to become calm or cool.
   [R.]
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         Dost thou think in time
         She will not quench!                     --Shak.
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