ragged


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Rag \Rag\ (r[a^]g), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Ragged (r[a^]gd); p.
   pr. & vb. n. Ragging (r[a^]g"g[i^]ng).]
   To become tattered. [Obs.]
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Ragged \Rag"ged\ (r[a^]g"g[e^]d), a. [From Rag, n.]
   1. Rent or worn into tatters, or till the texture is broken;
      as, a ragged coat; a ragged sail.
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   2. Broken with rough edges; having jags; uneven; rough;
      jagged; as, ragged rocks.
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   3. Hence, harsh and disagreeable to the ear; dissonant. [R.]
      "A ragged noise of mirth." --Herbert.
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   4. Wearing tattered clothes; as, a ragged fellow.
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   5. Rough; shaggy; rugged.
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            What shepherd owns those ragged sheep? --Dryden.
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   Ragged lady (Bot.), the fennel flower ({Nigella
      Damascena}).

   Ragged robin (Bot.), a plant of the genus Lychnis
      (Lychnis Flos-cuculi), cultivated for its handsome
      flowers, which have the petals cut into narrow lobes.

   Ragged sailor (Bot.), prince's feather ({Polygonum
      orientale}).

   Ragged school, a free school for poor children, where they
      are taught and in part fed; -- a name given at first
      because they came in their common clothing. [Eng.]
      [1913 Webster] -- Rag"ged*ly, adv. -- Rag"ged*ness, n.
      [1913 Webster] Raggie
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