reseda luteola


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Luteic \Lu*te"ic\, a. (Chem.)
   (a) Pertaining to, or derived from, weld (Reseda luteola).
   (b) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid resembling
       luteolin, but obtained from the flowers of {Euphorbia
       cyparissias}.
       [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Luteolin \Lu"te*o*lin\, n. [From NL. Reseda luteola, fr. L.
   luteolus yellowish, fr. luteus: cf. F. lut['e]oline. See
   Luteous.] (Chem.)
   A yellow dyestuff obtained from the foliage of the dyer's
   broom (Reseda luteola).
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Weld \Weld\ (w[e^]ld), n. [OE. welde; akin to Scot. wald, Prov.
   G. waude, G. wau, Dan. & Sw. vau, D. wouw.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. (Bot.) An herb (Reseda luteola) related to mignonette,
      growing in Europe, and to some extent in America; dyer's
      broom; dyer's rocket; dyer's weed; wild woad. It is used
      by dyers to give a yellow color. [Written also woald,
      wold, and would.]
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Coloring matter or dye extracted from this plant.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Woad \Woad\, n. [OE. wod, AS. w[=a]d; akin to D. weede, G. waid,
   OHG. weit, Dan. vaid, veid, Sw. veide, L. vitrum.] [Written
   also wad, and wade.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. (Bot.) An herbaceous cruciferous plant ({Isatis
      tinctoria}) of the family Cruciferae (syn.
      Brassicaceae). It was formerly cultivated for the blue
      coloring matter derived from its leaves. See isatin.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A blue dyestuff, or coloring matter, consisting of the
      powdered and fermented leaves of the Isatis tinctoria.
      It is now superseded by indigo, but is somewhat used with
      indigo as a ferment in dyeing.
      [1913 Webster]

            Their bodies . . . painted with woad in sundry
            figures.                              --Milton.
      [1913 Webster]

   Wild woad (Bot.), the weld (Reseda luteola). See Weld.
      

   Woad mill, a mill grinding and preparing woad.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Broom \Broom\ (br[=oo]m), n. [OE. brom, brome, AS. br[=o]m; akin
   to LG. bram, D. brem, OHG. br[=a]mo broom, thorn?bush, G.
   brombeere blackberry. Cf. Bramble, n.]
   1. (Bot.) A plant having twigs suitable for making brooms to
      sweep with when bound together; esp., the {Cytisus
      scoparius} of Western Europe, which is a low shrub with
      long, straight, green, angular branches, minute leaves,
      and large yellow flowers.
      [1913 Webster]

            No gypsy cowered o'er fires of furze and broom.
                                                  --Wordsworth.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. An implement for sweeping floors, etc., commonly made of
      the panicles or tops of broom corn, bound together or
      attached to a long wooden handle; -- so called because
      originally made of the twigs of the broom.
      [1913 Webster]

   Butcher's broom, a plant (Ruscus aculeatus) of the Smilax
      family, used by butchers for brooms to sweep their blocks;
      -- called also knee holly. See Cladophyll.

   Dyer's broom, a species of mignonette (Reseda luteola),
      used for dyeing yellow; dyer's weed; dyer's rocket.

   Spanish broom. See under Spanish.
      [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form