slaughter


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Slaughter \Slaugh"ter\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Slaughtered; p.
   pr. & vb. n. Slaughtering.]
   1. To visit with great destruction of life; to kill; to slay
      in battle.
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            Your castle is surprised; your wife and babes
            Savagely slaughtered.                 --Shak.
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   2. To butcher; to kill for the market, as beasts.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Slaughter \Slaugh"ter\, n. [OE. slautir, slaughter, slaghter,
   Icel. sl[=a]tr slain flesh, modified by OE. slaught, slaht,
   slaughter, fr. AS. sleaht a stroke, blow; both from the root
   of E. slay. See Slay, v. t., and cf. Onslaught.]
   The act of killing. Specifically:
   (a) The extensive, violent, bloody, or wanton destruction of
       life; carnage.
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             On war and mutual slaughter bent.    --Milton.
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   (b) The act of killing cattle or other beasts for market.
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   Syn: Carnage; massacre; butchery; murder; havoc.
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