snipe


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snipe \Snipe\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sniped; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Sniping.]
   1. To shoot or hunt snipe.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

   2. To shoot at detached men of an enemy's forces at long
      range, esp. when not in action; -- often with at.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

   snipe at, to aim petty or snide criticisms at (a person) in
      his absence.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snipe \Snipe\, n. [OE. snipe; akin to D. snep, snip, LG. sneppe,
   snippe, G. schnepfe, Icel. sn[imac]pa (in comp.), Dan.
   sneppe, Sw. sn[aum]ppa a sanpiper, and possibly to E. snap.
   See Snap, Snaffle.]
   1. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of limicoline game
      birds of the family Scolopacidae, having a long,
      slender, nearly straight beak.
      [1913 Webster]

   Note: The common, or whole, snipe (Gallinago c[oe]lestis)
         and the great, or double, snipe (Gallinago major),
         are the most important European species. The Wilson's
         snipe (Gallinago delicata) (sometimes erroneously
         called English snipe) and the gray snipe, or
         dowitcher (Macrohamphus griseus), are well-known
         American species.
         [1913 Webster]

   2. A fool; a blockhead. [R.] --Shak.
      [1913 Webster]

   Half snipe, the dunlin; the jacksnipe.

   Jack snipe. See Jacksnipe.

   Quail snipe. See under Quail.

   Robin snipe, the knot.

   Sea snipe. See in the Vocabulary.

   Shore snipe, any sandpiper.

   Snipe hawk, the marsh harrier. [Prov. Eng.]

   Stone snipe, the tattler.

   Summer snipe, the dunlin; the green and the common European
      sandpipers.

   Winter snipe. See Rock snipe, under Rock.

   Woodcock snipe, the great snipe.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snipe \Snipe\, v. t.
   1. To shoot at (detached men of an enemy's force) at long
      range, esp. when not in action.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

   2. To nose (a log) to make it drag or slip easily in
      skidding.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Willet \Wil"let\, n. (Zool.)
   A large North American snipe (Symphemia semipalmata); --
   called also pill-willet, will-willet, {semipalmated
   tattler}, or snipe, duck snipe, and stone curlew.
   [1913 Webster]

   Carolina willet, the Hudsonian godwit.
      [1913 Webster]
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