snuff


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snuff \Snuff\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Snuffed; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Snuffing.] [OE. snuffen. See Snuff of a candle Snuff to
   sniff.]
   To crop the snuff of, as a candle; to take off the end of the
   snuff of.
   [1913 Webster]

   To snuff out, to extinguish by snuffing.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snuff \Snuff\, v. t.[Akin to D. snuffen, G. schnupfen,
   schnuppen, to snuff, schnupfen a cold in the head, schnuppen
   to snuff (air), also, to snuff (a candle). Cf. Sniff,
   Snout, Snub, v. i.]
   1. To draw in, or to inhale, forcibly through the nose; to
      sniff.
      [1913 Webster]

            He snuffs the wind, his heels the sand excite.
                                                  --Dryden.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To perceive by the nose; to scent; to smell.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snuff \Snuff\, v. i.
   1. To inhale air through the nose with violence or with
      noise, as do dogs and horses. --Dryden.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To turn up the nose and inhale air, as an expression of
      contempt; hence, to take offense.
      [1913 Webster]

            Do the enemies of the church rage and snuff? --Bp.
                                                  Hall.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snuff \Snuff\, n. [Cf. G. schnuppe candle snuff, schnuppen to
   snuff a candle (see Snuff, v. t., to snuff a candle), or
   cf. Snub, v. t.]
   The part of a candle wick charred by the flame, whether
   burning or not.
   [1913 Webster]

         If the burning snuff happens to get out of the
         snuffers, you have a chance that it may fall into a
         dish of soup.                            --Swift.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Snuff \Snuff\, n.
   1. The act of snuffing; perception by snuffing; a sniff.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Pulverized tobacco, etc., prepared to be taken into the
      nose; also, the amount taken at once.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. Resentment, displeasure, or contempt, expressed by a
      snuffing of the nose. [Obs.]
      [1913 Webster]

   Snuff dipping. See Dipping, n., 5.

   Snuff taker, one who uses snuff by inhaling it through the
      nose.

   To take it in snuff, to be angry or offended. --Shak.

   Up to snuff, not likely to be imposed upon; knowing; acute.
      [Slang]
      [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form