sorrow


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Sorrow \Sor"row\, n. [OE. sorwe, sorewe, sor?e, AS. sorg, sorh;
   akin to D. zorg care, anxiety, OS. sorga, OHG. sorga, soraga,
   suorga, G. sorge, Icel., Sw., & Dan. sorg, Goth. sa['u]rga;
   of unknown origin.]
   The uneasiness or pain of mind which is produced by the loss
   of any good, real or supposed, or by diseappointment in the
   expectation of good; grief at having suffered or occasioned
   evil; regret; unhappiness; sadness. --Milton.
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         How great a sorrow suffereth now Arcite! --Chaucer.
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         The safe and general antidote against sorrow is
         employment.                              --Rambler.
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   Syn: Grief; unhappiness; regret; sadness; heaviness;
        mourning; affliction. See Affliction, and Grief.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Sorrow \Sor"row\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sorrowed; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Sorrowing.] [OE. sorowen, sorwen, sorhen, AS. sorgian;
   akin to Goth. sa['u]rgan. See Sorrow, n.]
   To feel pain of mind in consequence of evil experienced,
   feared, or done; to grieve; to be sad; to be sorry.
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         Sorrowing most of all . . . that they should see his
         face no more.                            --Acts xx. 38.
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         I desire no man to sorrow for me.        --Sir J.
                                                  Hayward.
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