still


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Still \Still\, n. [Cf. G. stille.]
   1. Freedom from noise; calm; silence; as, the still of
      midnight. [Poetic]
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   2. A steep hill or ascent. [Obs.] --W. Browne.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Still \Still\, adv. [AS. stille quietly. See Still, a. The
   modern senses come from the idea of stopping and staying
   still, or motionless.]
   1. To this time; until and during the time now present; now
      no less than before; yet.
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            It hath been anciently reported, and is still
            received.                             --Bacon.
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   2. In the future as now and before.
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            Hourly joys be still upon you!        --Shak.
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   3. In continuation by successive or repeated acts; always;
      ever; constantly; uniformly.
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            The desire of fame betrays an ambitious man into
            indecencies that lessen his reputation; he is still
            afraid lest any of his actions should be thrown away
            in private.                           --Addison.
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            Chemists would be rich if they could still do in
            great quantities what they have sometimes done in
            little.                               --Boyle.
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   4. In an increasing or additional degree; even more; -- much
      used with comparatives.
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            The guilt being great, the fear doth still exceed.
                                                  --Shak.
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   5. Notwithstanding what has been said or done; in spite of
      what has occured; nevertheless; -- sometimes used as a
      conjunction. See Synonym of But.
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            As sunshine, broken in the rill,
            Though turned astray, is sunshine still. --Moore.
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   6. After that; after what is stated.
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            In the primitive church, such as by fear being
            compelled to sacrifice to strange gods, after
            repented, and kept still the office of preaching the
            gospel.                               --Whitgift.
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   Still and anon, at intervals and repeatedly; continually;
      ever and anon; now and then.
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            And like the watchful minutes to the hour,
            Still and anon cheered up the heavy time. --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Still \Still\, a. [Compar. Stiller; superl. Stillest.] [OE.
   stille, AS. stille; akin to D. stil, OS. & OHG. stilli, G.
   still, Dan. stille, Sw. stilla, and to E. stall; from the
   idea of coming to a stand, or halt. Cf. Still, adv.]
   1. Motionless; at rest; quiet; as, to stand still; to lie or
      sit still. "Still as any stone." --Chaucer.
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   2. Uttering no sound; silent; as, the audience is still; the
      animals are still.
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            The sea that roared at thy command,
            At thy command was still.             --Addison.
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   3. Not disturbed by noise or agitation; quiet; calm; as, a
      still evening; a still atmosphere. "When all the woods are
      still." --Milton.
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   4. Comparatively quiet or silent; soft; gentle; low. "A still
      small voice." --1 Kings xix. 12.
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   5. Constant; continual. [Obs.]
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            By still practice learn to know thy meaning. --Shak.
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   6. Not effervescing; not sparkling; as, still wines.
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   Still life. (Fine Arts)
      (a) Inanimate objects.
      (b) (Painting) The class or style of painting which
          represents inanimate objects, as fruit, flowers, dead
          game, etc.
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   Syn: Quiet; calm; noiseless; serene; motionless; inert;
        stagnant.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Still \Still\, n. [Cf. OE. stillatorie. See Still, v., to
   distill.]
   1. A vessel, boiler, or copper used in the distillation of
      liquids; specifically, one used for the distillation of
      alcoholic liquors; a retort. The name is sometimes applied
      to the whole apparatus used in in vaporization and
      condensation.
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   2. A house where liquors are distilled; a distillery.
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   Still watcher, a device for indicating the progress of
      distillation by the density of the liquid given over.
      --Knight.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Still \Still\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Stilled; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Stilling.] [AS. stillan, from stille still, quiet, firm.
   See Still, a.]
   1. To stop, as motion or agitation; to cause to become quiet,
      or comparatively quiet; to check the agitation of; as, to
      still the raging sea.
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            He having a full sway over the water, had power to
            still and compose it, as well as to move and disturb
            it.                                   --Woodward.
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   2. To stop, as noise; to silence.
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            With his name the mothers still their babies.
                                                  --Shak.
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   3. To appease; to calm; to quiet, as tumult, agitation, or
      excitement; as, to still the passions. --Shak.
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            Toil that would, at least, have stilled an unquiet
            impulse in me.                        --Hawthorne.
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   Syn: To quiet; calm; allay; lull; pacify; appease; subdue;
        suppress; silence; stop; check; restrain.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Still \Still\, v. t. [Abbreviated fr. distill.]
   1. To cause to fall by drops.
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   2. To expel spirit from by heat, or to evaporate and condense
      in a refrigeratory; to distill. --Tusser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Still \Still\, v. i. [L. stillare. Cf. Distill.]
   To drop, or flow in drops; to distill. [Obs.] --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wine \Wine\, n. [OE. win, AS. win, fr. L. vinum (cf. Icel.
   v[imac]n; all from the Latin); akin to Gr. o'i^nos, ?, and E.
   withy. Cf. Vine, Vineyard, Vinous, Withy.]
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   1. The expressed juice of grapes, esp. when fermented; a
      beverage or liquor prepared from grapes by squeezing out
      their juice, and (usually) allowing it to ferment. "Red
      wine of Gascoigne." --Piers Plowman.
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            Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging, and
            whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise. --Prov.
                                                  xx. 1.
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            Bacchus, that first from out the purple grape
            Crushed the sweet poison of misused wine. --Milton.
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   Note: Wine is essentially a dilute solution of ethyl alcohol,
         containing also certain small quantities of ethers and
         ethereal salts which give character and bouquet.
         According to their color, strength, taste, etc., wines
         are called red, white, spirituous, dry,
         light, still, etc.
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   2. A liquor or beverage prepared from the juice of any fruit
      or plant by a process similar to that for grape wine; as,
      currant wine; gooseberry wine; palm wine.
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   3. The effect of drinking wine in excess; intoxication.
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            Noah awoke from his wine.             --Gen. ix. 24.
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   Birch wine, Cape wine, etc. See under Birch, Cape,
      etc.

   Spirit of wine. See under Spirit.

   To have drunk wine of ape or To have drunk wine ape, to
      be so drunk as to be foolish. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

   Wine acid. (Chem.) See Tartaric acid, under Tartaric.
      [Colloq.]

   Wine apple (Bot.), a large red apple, with firm flesh and a
      rich, vinous flavor.

   Wine fly (Zool.), small two-winged fly of the genus
      Piophila, whose larva lives in wine, cider, and other
      fermented liquors.

   Wine grower, one who cultivates a vineyard and makes wine.
      

   Wine measure, the measure by which wines and other spirits
      are sold, smaller than beer measure.

   Wine merchant, a merchant who deals in wines.

   Wine of opium (Pharm.), a solution of opium in aromatized
      sherry wine, having the same strength as ordinary
      laudanum; -- also Sydenham's laudanum.

   Wine press, a machine or apparatus in which grapes are
      pressed to extract their juice.

   Wine skin, a bottle or bag of skin, used, in various
      countries, for carrying wine.

   Wine stone, a kind of crust deposited in wine casks. See
      1st Tartar, 1.

   Wine vault.
      (a) A vault where wine is stored.
      (b) A place where wine is served at the bar, or at tables;
          a dramshop. --Dickens.

   Wine vinegar, vinegar made from wine.

   Wine whey, whey made from milk coagulated by the use of
      wine.
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