thrill


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrill \Thrill\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Thrilled; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Thrilling.] [OE. thrillen, [thorn]irlen, [thorn]urlen, to
   pierce; all probably fr. AS. [thorn]yrlian, [thorn]yrelian,
   Fr. [thorn]yrel pierced; as a noun, a hole, fr. [thorn]urh
   through; probably akin to D. drillen to drill, to bore.
   [root]53. See Through, and cf. Drill to bore, Nostril,
   Trill to trickle.]
   1. To perforate by a pointed instrument; to bore; to
      transfix; to drill. [Obs.]
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            He pierced through his chafed chest
            With thrilling point of deadly iron brand.
                                                  --Spenser.
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   2. Hence, to affect, as if by something that pierces or
      pricks; to cause to have a shivering, throbbing, tingling,
      or exquisite sensation; to pierce; to penetrate.
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            To bathe in flery floods, or to reside
            In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice. --Shak.
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            Vivid and picturesque turns of expression which
            thrill the ?eader with sudden delight. --M. Arnold.
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            The cruel word her tender heart so thrilled,
            That sudden cold did run through every vein.
                                                  --Spenser.
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   3. To hurl; to throw; to cast. [Obs.]
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            I'll thrill my javelin.               --Heywood.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrill \Thrill\, n.
   1. A drill. See 3d Drill, 1.
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   2. A sensation as of being thrilled; a tremulous excitement;
      as, a thrill of horror; a thrill of joy. --Burns.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrill \Thrill\, v. i.
   1. To pierce, as something sharp; to penetrate; especially,
      to cause a tingling sensation that runs through the system
      with a slight shivering; as, a sharp sound thrills through
      the whole frame.
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            I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins.
                                                  --Shak.
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   2. To feel a sharp, shivering, tingling, or exquisite
      sensation, running through the body.
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            To seek sweet safety out
            In vaults and prisons, and to thrill and shake.
                                                  --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrill \Thrill\ (thr[i^]l), n. [See Trill.]
   A warbling; a trill.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrill \Thrill\, n. [AS. [thorn]yrel an aperture. See Thrill,
   v. t.]
   A breathing place or hole; a nostril, as of a bird.
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