thrust


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrust \Thrust\, v. i.
   1. To make a push; to attack with a pointed weapon; as, a
      fencer thrusts at his antagonist.
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   2. To enter by pushing; to squeeze in.
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            And thrust between my father and the god. --Dryden.
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   3. To push forward; to come with force; to press on; to
      intrude. "Young, old, thrust there in mighty concourse."
      --Chapman.
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   To thrust to, to rush upon. [Obs.]
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            As doth an eager hound
            Thrust to an hind within some covert glade.
                                                  --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrust \Thrust\, n. & v.
   Thrist. [Obs.] --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrust \Thrust\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Thrust; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Thrusting.] [OE. ?rusten, ?risten, ?resten, Icel. ?r?st? to
   thrust, press, force, compel; perhaps akin to E. threat.]
   1. To push or drive with force; to drive, force, or impel; to
      shove; as, to thrust anything with the hand or foot, or
      with an instrument.
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            Into a dungeon thrust, to work with slaves.
                                                  --Milton.
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   2. To stab; to pierce; -- usually with through.
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   To thrust away or To thrust from, to push away; to
      reject.

   To thrust in, to push or drive in.

   To thrust off, to push away.

   To thrust on, to impel; to urge.

   To thrust one's self in or To thrust one's self into, to
      obtrude upon, to intrude, as into a room; to enter (a
      place) where one is not invited or not welcome.

   To thrust out, to drive out or away; to expel.

   To thrust through, to pierce; to stab. "I am eight times
      thrust through the doublet." --Shak.

   To thrust together, to compress.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Thrust \Thrust\, n.
   1. A violent push or driving, as with a pointed weapon moved
      in the direction of its length, or with the hand or foot,
      or with any instrument; a stab; -- a word much used as a
      term of fencing.
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            [Polites] Pyrrhus with his lance pursues,
            And often reaches, and his thrusts renews. --Dryden.
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   2. An attack; an assault.
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            One thrust at your pure, pretended mechanism. --Dr.
                                                  H. More.
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   3. (Mech.) The force or pressure of one part of a
      construction against other parts; especially (Arch.), a
      horizontal or diagonal outward pressure, as of an arch
      against its abutments, or of rafters against the wall
      which support them.
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   4. (Mining) The breaking down of the roof of a gallery under
      its superincumbent weight.
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   Thrust bearing (Screw Steamers), a bearing arranged to
      receive the thrust or endwise pressure of the screw shaft.
      

   Thrust plane (Geol.), the surface along which dislocation
      has taken place in the case of a reversed fault.
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   Syn: Push; shove; assault; attack.

   Usage: Thrust, Push, Shove. Push and shove usually
          imply the application of force by a body already in
          contact with the body to be impelled. Thrust, often,
          but not always, implies the impulse or application of
          force by a body which is in motion before it reaches
          the body to be impelled.
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