toil


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Toil \Toil\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Toiled; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Toiling.] [OE. toilen to pull about, to toil; of uncertain
   origin; cf. OD. teulen, tuylen, to labor, till, or OF.
   tooillier, toailler, to wash, rub (cf. Towel); or perhaps
   ultimately from the same root as E. tug.]
   To exert strength with pain and fatigue of body or mind,
   especially of the body, with efforts of some continuance or
   duration; to labor; to work.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Toil \Toil\, v. t.
   1. To weary; to overlabor. [Obs.] "Toiled with works of war."
      --Shak.
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   2. To labor; to work; -- often with out. [R.]
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            Places well toiled and husbanded.     --Holland.
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            [I] toiled out my uncouth passage.    --Milton.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Toil \Toil\, n. [OE. toil turmoil, struggle; cf. OD. tuyl labor,
   work. See Toil, v.]
   Labor with pain and fatigue; labor that oppresses the body or
   mind, esp. the body.
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         My task of servile toil.                 --Milton.
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         After such bloody toil, we bid good night. --Shak.
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   Note: Toil is used in the formation of compounds which are
         generally of obvious signification; as, toil-strung,
         toil-wasted, toil-worn, and the like.
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   Syn: Labor; drudgery; work; exertion; occupation; employment;
        task; travail.

   Usage: Toil, Labor, Drudgery. Labor implies strenuous
          exertion, but not necessary such as overtasks the
          faculties; toil denotes a severity of labor which is
          painful and exhausting; drudgery implies mean and
          degrading work, or, at least, work which wearies or
          disgusts from its minuteness or dull uniformity.
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                You do not know the heavy grievances,
                The toils, the labors, weary drudgeries,
                Which they impose.                --Southern.
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                How often have I blessed the coming day,
                When toil remitting lent its turn to play.
                                                  --Goldsmith.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Toil \Toil\, n. [F. toiles, pl., toils, nets, fr. toile cloth,
   canvas, spider web, fr. L. tela any woven stuff, a web, fr.
   texere to weave. See Text, and cf. Toilet.]
   A net or snare; any thread, web, or string spread for taking
   prey; -- usually in the plural.
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         As a Numidian lion, when first caught,
         Endures the toil that holds him.         --Denham.
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         Then toils for beasts, and lime for birds, were found.
                                                  --Dryden.
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