truck


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lorrie \Lor"rie\, Lorry \Lor"ry\, n.; pl. Lorries. [Prob. from
   lurry to pull or lug.]
   1. A small cart or wagon moving on rails, as those used on
      the tramways in mines to carry coal or rubbish; also, a
      barrow or truck for shifting baggage, as at railway
      stations.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A motorized wheeled land vehicle, esp. a large one, with a
      cab for the driver and a separate rear compartment for
      transporting freight; called truck in the U. S. [Brit.]

   Syn: camion.
        [PJC]

   3. a large low horse-drawn wagon without sides. [WordNet
      sense 1]
      [WordNet 1.5]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Truck \Truck\, v. t.
   To transport on a truck or trucks.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Truck \Truck\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Trucked; p. pr. & vb. n.
   trucking.] [OE. trukken,F. troquer; akin to Sp. & Pg.
   trocar; of uncertain origin.]
   To exchange; to give in exchange; to barter; as, to truck
   knives for gold dust.
   [1913 Webster]

         We will begin by supposing the international trade to
         be in form, what it always is in reality, an actual
         trucking of one commodity against another. --J. S.
                                                  Mill.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Truck \Truck\, n. [L. trochus an iron hoop, Gr. ? a wheel, fr. ?
   to run. See Trochee, and cf. Truckle, v. i.]
   1. A small wheel, as of a vehicle; specifically (Ord.), a
      small strong wheel, as of wood or iron, for a gun
      carriage.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A low, wheeled vehicle or barrow for carrying goods,
      stone, and other heavy articles.
      [1913 Webster]

            Goods were conveyed about the town almost
            exclusively in trucks drawn by dogs.  --Macaulay.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. (Railroad Mach.) A swiveling carriage, consisting of a
      frame with one or more pairs of wheels and the necessary
      boxes, springs, etc., to carry and guide one end of a
      locomotive or a car; -- sometimes called bogie in England.
      Trucks usually have four or six wheels.
      [1913 Webster]

   4. (Naut.)
      (a) A small wooden cap at the summit of a flagstaff or a
          masthead, having holes in it for reeving halyards
          through.
      (b) A small piece of wood, usually cylindrical or
          disk-shaped, used for various purposes.
          [1913 Webster]

   5. A freight car. [Eng.]
      [1913 Webster]

   6. A frame on low wheels or rollers; -- used for various
      purposes, as for a movable support for heavy bodies.
      [1913 Webster]

   7. a motorized vehicle larger than an automobile with a
      compartment in front for the driver, behind which is a
      separate compartment for freight; esp.
      (a) such a vehicle with an inflexible body.
      (b) A vehicle with a short body and a support for
          attaching a trailer; -- also called a tractor[4].
      (c) the combination of tractor and trailer, also called a
          tractor-trailer (a form of articulated vehicle); it
          is a common form of truck, and is used primarily for
          hauling freight on a highway.
      (d) a tractor with more than one trailer attached in a
          series. In Australia, often referred to as a {road
          train}.
          [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Truck \Truck\, v. i.
   To exchange commodities; to barter; to trade; to deal.
   [1913 Webster]

         A master of a ship, who deceived them under color of
         trucking with them.                      --Palfrey.
   [1913 Webster]

         Despotism itself is obliged to truck and huckster.
                                                  --Burke.
   [1913 Webster]

         To truck and higgle for a private good.  --Emerson.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Truck \Truck\, n. [Cf. F. troc.]
   1. Exchange of commodities; barter. --Hakluyt.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Commodities appropriate for barter, or for small trade;
      small commodities; esp., in the United States, garden
      vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
      [1913 Webster]

   3. The practice of paying wages in goods instead of money; --
      called also truck system.
      [1913 Webster]

   Garden truck, vegetables raised for market. [Colloq.] [U.
      S.]

   Truck farming, raising vegetables for market: market
      gardening. [Colloq. U. S.]
      [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form