vamp


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

vamp \vamp\, v. t. & i.
   To seduce (a man) sexually for purpose of exploitation.
   [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Vamp \Vamp\ (v[a^]mp), v. i.
   To advance; to travel. [Obs.]
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Vamp \Vamp\, n. [OE. vampe, vaumpe, vauntpe, F. avantpied the
   forefoot, vamp; avant before, fore + pied foot, L. pes. See
   Advance, Van of an army, and Foot.]
   1. The part of a boot or shoe above the sole and welt, and in
      front of the ankle seam; an upper.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Any piece added to an old thing to give it a new
      appearance. See Vamp, v. t.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. (Music) A usually improvized Jazz accompaniment,
      consisting of simple chords in sucession.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

vamp \vamp\, n.
   A woman who seduces men with her charm and wiles, in order to
   exploit them.
   [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Vamp \Vamp\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Vamped (?; 215); p. pr. & vb.
   n. Vamping.]
   1. To provide, as a shoe, with new upper leather; hence, to
      to piece, as any old thing, with a new part; to repair; to
      patch; -- often followed by up.
      [1913 Webster]

            I had never much hopes of your vamped play. --Swift.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To create with little skill; to concoct; to invent; --
      usually with up; as, he vamped up an implausible excuse.
      [PJC]
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