wad


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wad \Wad\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Waded; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Wadding.]
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   1. To form into a mass, or wad, or into wadding; as, to wad
      tow or cotton.
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   2. To insert or crowd a wad into; as, to wad a gun; also, to
      stuff or line with some soft substance, or wadding, like
      cotton; as, to wad a cloak.
      [1913 Webster] Wad
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wad \Wad\, Wadd \Wadd\, n. (Min.)
      (a) An earthy oxide of manganese, or mixture of different
          oxides and water, with some oxide of iron, and often
          silica, alumina, lime, or baryta; black ocher. There
          are several varieties.
      (b) Plumbago, or black lead.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wad \Wad\, n. [See Woad.]
   Woad. [Obs.]
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wad \Wad\, n. [Probably of Scand. origin; cf. Sw. vadd wadding,
   Dan vat, D. & G. watte. Cf. Wadmol.]
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   1. A little mass, tuft, or bundle, as of hay or tow.
      --Holland.
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   2. Specifically: A little mass of some soft or flexible
      material, such as hay, straw, tow, paper, or old rope
      yarn, used for retaining a charge of powder in a gun, or
      for keeping the powder and shot close; also, to diminish
      or avoid the effects of windage. Also, by extension, a
      dusk of felt, pasteboard, etc., serving a similar purpose.
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   3. A soft mass, especially of some loose, fibrous substance,
      used for various purposes, as for stopping an aperture,
      padding a garment, etc.
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   Wed hook, a rod with a screw or hook at the end, used for
      removing the wad from a gun.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Woad \Woad\, n. [OE. wod, AS. w[=a]d; akin to D. weede, G. waid,
   OHG. weit, Dan. vaid, veid, Sw. veide, L. vitrum.] [Written
   also wad, and wade.]
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   1. (Bot.) An herbaceous cruciferous plant ({Isatis
      tinctoria}) of the family Cruciferae (syn.
      Brassicaceae). It was formerly cultivated for the blue
      coloring matter derived from its leaves. See isatin.
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   2. A blue dyestuff, or coloring matter, consisting of the
      powdered and fermented leaves of the Isatis tinctoria.
      It is now superseded by indigo, but is somewhat used with
      indigo as a ferment in dyeing.
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            Their bodies . . . painted with woad in sundry
            figures.                              --Milton.
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   Wild woad (Bot.), the weld (Reseda luteola). See Weld.
      

   Woad mill, a mill grinding and preparing woad.
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