whoop


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hoopoe \Hoop"oe\, Hoopoo \Hoop"oo\, n. [So called from its cry;
   cf. L. upupa, Gr. ?, D. hop, F. huppe; cf. also G.
   wiedenhopf, OHG. wituhopfo, lit., wood hopper.] (Zool.)
   A European bird of the genus Upupa (Upupa epops), having
   a beautiful crest, which it can erect or depress at pleasure,
   and a slender down-curving bill. Called also hoop, whoop.
   The name is also applied to several other species of the same
   genus and allied genera.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hoop \Hoop\, v. i. [OE. houpen; cf. F. houper to hoop, to shout;
   -- a hunting term, prob. fr. houp, an interj. used in
   calling. Cf. Whoop.]
   1. To utter a loud cry, or a sound imitative of the word, by
      way of call or pursuit; to shout. [Usually written
      whoop.]
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   2. To whoop, as in whooping cough. See Whoop.
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   Hooping cough. (Med.) See Whooping cough.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whoop \Whoop\, n. [See Hoopoe.] (Zool.)
   The hoopoe.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whoop \Whoop\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Whooped; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Whooping.] [OE. houpen. See Hoop, v. i.]
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   1. To utter a whoop, or loud cry, as eagerness, enthusiasm,
      or enjoyment; to cry out; to shout; to halloo; to utter a
      war whoop; to hoot, as an owl.
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            Each whooping with a merry shout.     --Wordsworth.
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            When naught was heard but now and then the howl
            Of some vile cur, or whooping of the owl. --W.
                                                  Browne.
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   2. To cough or breathe with a sonorous inspiration, as in
      whooping cough.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whoop \Whoop\, v. t.
   To insult with shouts; to chase with derision.
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         And suffered me by the voice of slaves to be
         Whooped out of Rome.                     --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Whoop \Whoop\, n.
   1. A shout of pursuit or of war; a very of eagerness,
      enthusiasm, enjoyment, vengeance, terror, or the like; an
      halloo; a hoot, or cry, as of an owl.
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            A fox, crossing the road, drew off a considerable
            detachment, who clapped spurs to their horses, and
            pursued him with whoops and halloos.  --Addison.
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            The whoop of the crane.               --Longfellow.
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   2. A loud, shrill, prolonged sound or sonorous inspiration,
      as in whooping cough.
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