winch


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Winch \Winch\, v. i. [See Wince.]
   To wince; to shrink; to kick with impatience or uneasiness.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Winch \Winch\, n.
   A kick, as of a beast, from impatience or uneasiness.
   --Shelton.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Winch \Winch\, n. [OE. winche, AS. wince a winch, a reel to wind
   thread upon. Cf. Wink.]
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   1. A crank with a handle, for giving motion to a machine, a
      grindstone, etc.
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   2. An instrument with which to turn or strain something
      forcibly.
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   3. An axle or drum turned by a crank with a handle, or by
      power, for raising weights, as from the hold of a ship,
      from mines, etc.; a windlass.
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   4. A wince.
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