wonder


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wonder \Won"der\, n. [OE. wonder, wunder, AS. wundor; akin to D.
   wonder, OS. wundar, OHG. wuntar, G. wunder, Icel. undr, Sw. &
   Dan. under, and perhaps to Gr. ? to gaze at.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. That emotion which is excited by novelty, or the
      presentation to the sight or mind of something new,
      unusual, strange, great, extraordinary, or not well
      understood; surprise; astonishment; admiration; amazement.
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            They were filled with wonder and amazement at that
            which had happened unto him.          --Acts iii.
                                                  10.
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            Wonder is the effect of novelty upon ignorance.
                                                  --Johnson.
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   Note: Wonder expresses less than astonishment, and much less
         than amazement. It differs from admiration, as now
         used, in not being necessarily accompanied with love,
         esteem, or approbation.
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   2. A cause of wonder; that which excites surprise; a strange
      thing; a prodigy; a miracle. " Babylon, the wonder of all
      tongues." --Milton.
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            To try things oft, and never to give over, doth
            wonders.                              --Bacon.
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            I am as a wonder unto many.           --Ps. lxxi. 7.
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   Seven wonders of the world. See in the Dictionary of Noted
      Names in Fiction.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wonder \Won"der\, a.
   Wonderful. [Obs.] --Gower.
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         After that he said a wonder thing.       --Chaucer.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wonder \Won"der\, adv.
   Wonderfully. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wonder \Won"der\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Wondered; p. pr. & vb.
   n. Wondering.] [AS. wundrian.]
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   1. To be affected with surprise or admiration; to be struck
      with astonishment; to be amazed; to marvel.
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            I could not sufficiently wonder at the intrepidity
            of these diminutive mortals.          --Swift.
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            We cease to wonder at what we understand. --Johnson.
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   2. To feel doubt and curiosity; to wait with uncertain
      expectation; to query in the mind; as, he wondered why
      they came.
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            I wonder, in my soul,
            What you would ask me, that I should deny. --Shak.
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