wrecking


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wreck \Wreck\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wrecked; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Wrecking.]
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   1. To destroy, disable, or seriously damage, as a vessel, by
      driving it against the shore or on rocks, by causing it to
      become unseaworthy, to founder, or the like; to shipwreck.
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            Supposing that they saw the king's ship wrecked.
                                                  --Shak.
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   2. To bring wreck or ruin upon by any kind of violence; to
      destroy, as a railroad train.
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   3. To involve in a wreck; hence, to cause to suffer ruin; to
      balk of success, and bring disaster on.
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            Weak and envied, if they should conspire,
            They wreck themselves.                --Daniel.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wrecking \Wreck"ing\,
   a. & n. from Wreck, v.
   [1913 Webster]

   Wrecking car (Railway), a car fitted up with apparatus and
      implements for removing the wreck occasioned by an
      accident, as by a collision.

   Wrecking pump, a pump especially adapted for pumping water
      from the hull of a wrecked vessel.
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