yawl


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

yawl \yawl\ (y[add]l), n. [D. jol; akin to LG. & Dan. jolle, Sw.
   julle. Cf. Jolly-boat.]
   1. (Naut.) A small ship's boat, usually rowed by four or six
      oars. [Written also yaul.]
      [1913 Webster]

   2. A fore-and-aft-rigged vessel with two masts, a mainmast
      carrying a mainsail and jibs, taller than the mizzenmast
      and stepped a little farther forward than in a sloop,
      and with the mizzenmast, or jiggermast far aft, usually
      placed aft of the water line or aft the rudder post. The
      mizzenmast of a yawl is smaller, and set further aft, than
      that of a sloop.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl. +RDH]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Yawl \Yawl\, v. i. [OE. [yogh]aulen, [yogh]oulen, gaulen,
   goulen, Icel. gaula to low, bellow. Cf. Gowl.]
   To cry out like a dog or cat; to howl; to yell. --Tennyson.
   [1913 Webster]

         There howling Scyllas yawling round about. --Fairfax.
   [1913 Webster]
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