bag


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Receptacle \Re*cep"ta*cle\ (r[-e]*s[e^]p"t[.a]*k'l), n. [F.
   r['e]ceptacle, L. receptaculum, fr. receptare, v. intens. fr.
   recipere to receive. See Receive.]
   1. That which serves, or is used, for receiving and
      containing something, as for examople, a basket, a
      vase, a bag, a reservoir; a repository.
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            O sacred receptacle of my joys!       --Shak.
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   2. (Bot.)
      (a) The apex of the flower stalk, from which the organs of
          the flower grow, or into which they are inserted. See
          Illust. of Flower, and Ovary.
      (b) The dilated apex of a pedicel which serves as a common
          support to a head of flowers.
      (c) An intercellular cavity containing oil or resin or
          other matters.
      (d) A special branch which bears the fructification in
          many cryptogamous plants.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Udder \Ud"der\, n. [OE. uddir, AS. [=u]der; akin to D. uijer, G.
   euter, OHG. [=u]tar, [=u]tiro, Icel. j[=u]gr, Sw. jufver,
   jur, Dan. yver, L. uber, Gr. o"y^qar, Skr. [=u]dhar.
   [root]216. Cf. Exuberant.]
   1. (Anat.) The glandular organ in which milk is secreted and
      stored; -- popularly called the bag in cows and other
      quadrupeds. See Mamma.
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            A lioness, with udders all drawn dry. --Shak.
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   2. One of the breasts of a woman. [R.]
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            Yon Juno of majestic size,
            With cowlike udders, and with oxlike eyes. --Pope.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bag \Bag\ (b[a^]g), n. [OE. bagge; cf. Icel. baggi, and also OF.
   bague, bundle, LL. baga.]
   1. A sack or pouch, used for holding anything; as, a bag of
      meal or of money.
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   2. A sac, or dependent gland, in animal bodies, containing
      some fluid or other substance; as, the bag of poison in
      the mouth of some serpents; the bag of a cow.
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   3. A sort of silken purse formerly tied about men's hair
      behind, by way of ornament. [Obs.]
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   4. The quantity of game bagged.
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   5. (Com.) A certain quantity of a commodity, such as it is
      customary to carry to market in a sack; as, a bag of
      pepper or hops; a bag of coffee.
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   Bag and baggage, all that belongs to one.

   To give one the bag, to disappoint him. [Obs.] --Bunyan.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bag \Bag\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bagged (b[a^]gd); p. pr. & vb.
   n. Bagging]
   1. To put into a bag; as, to bag hops.
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   2. To seize, capture, or entrap; as, to bag an army; to bag
      game.
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   3. To furnish or load with a bag or with a well filled bag.
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            A bee bagged with his honeyed venom.  --Dryden.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bag \Bag\, v. i.
   1. To swell or hang down like a full bag; as, the skin bags
      from containing morbid matter.
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   2. To swell with arrogance. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
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   3. To become pregnant. [Obs.] --Warner. (Alb. Eng.).
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