bard


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bard \Bard\, Barde \Barde\ (b[aum]rd), n. [F. barde, of doubtful
   origin.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. A piece of defensive (or, sometimes, ornamental) armor for
      a horse's neck, breast, and flanks; a barb. [Often in the
      pl.]
      [1913 Webster]

   2. pl. Defensive armor formerly worn by a man at arms.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. (Cookery) A thin slice of fat bacon used to cover any meat
      or game.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bard \Bard\, v. t. (Cookery)
   To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bard \Bard\ (b[aum]rd), n. [Of Celtic origin; cf. W. bardd, Arm.
   barz, Ir. & Gael. bard, and F. barde.]
   1. A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient
      Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in
      honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Hence: A poet; as, the bard of Avon.
      [1913 Webster] Bard
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bard \Bard\, n. [Akin to Dan. & Sw. bark, Icel. b["o]rkr, LG. &
   HG. borke.]
   1. The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree;
      the rind.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. Specifically, Peruvian bark.
      [1913 Webster]

   Bark bed. See Bark stove (below).

   Bark pit, a pit filled with bark and water, in which hides
      are steeped in tanning.

   Bark stove (Hort.), a glazed structure for keeping tropical
      plants, having a bed of tanner's bark (called a bark bed)
      or other fermentable matter which produces a moist heat.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Eelpout \Eel"pout`\, n. [AS. ?lepute.] (Zo["o]l.)
   (a) A European fish (Zoarces viviparus), remarkable for
       producing living young; -- called also greenbone,
       guffer, bard, and Maroona eel. Also, an American
       species (Z. anguillaris), -- called also mutton fish,
       and, erroneously, congo eel, ling, and lamper eel.
       Both are edible, but of little value.
   (b) A fresh-water fish, the burbot.
       [1913 Webster]
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