bay


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, n. [F. baie, fr. LL. baia. Of uncertain origin: cf.
   Ir. & Gael. badh or bagh bay, harbor, creek; Bisc. baia,
   baiya, harbor, and F. bayer to gape, open the mouth.]
   1. (Geog.) An inlet of the sea, usually smaller than a gulf,
      but of the same general character.
      [1913 Webster]

   Note: The name is not used with much precision, and is often
         applied to large tracts of water, around which the land
         forms a curve; as, Hudson's Bay. The name is not
         restricted to tracts of water with a narrow entrance,
         but is used for any recess or inlet between capes or
         headlands; as, the Bay of Biscay.
         [1913 Webster]

   2. A small body of water set off from the main body; as a
      compartment containing water for a wheel; the portion of a
      canal just outside of the gates of a lock, etc.
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   3. A recess or indentation shaped like a bay.
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   4. A principal compartment of the walls, roof, or other part
      of a building, or of the whole building, as marked off by
      the buttresses, vaulting, mullions of a window, etc.; one
      of the main divisions of any structure, as the part of a
      bridge between two piers.
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   5. A compartment in a barn, for depositing hay, or grain in
      the stalks.
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   6. A kind of mahogany obtained from Campeachy Bay.
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   Sick bay, in vessels of war, that part of a deck
      appropriated to the use of the sick. --Totten.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\ (b[=a]), a. [F. bai, fr. L. badius brown,
   chestnut-colored; -- used only of horses.]
   Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; -- applied to the
   color of horses.
   [1913 Webster]

   Bay cat (Zool.), a wild cat of Africa and the East Indies
      (Felis aurata).

   Bay lynx (Zool.), the common American lynx (Lynx lynx,
      formerly Felis rufa or Lynx rufa).
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Bayed (b[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Baying.] [OE. bayen, abayen, OF. abaier, F. aboyer, to
   bark; of uncertain origin.]
   To bark, as a dog with a deep voice does, at his game.
   [1913 Webster]

         The hounds at nearer distance hoarsely bayed. --Dryden.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, v. t.
   To bark at; hence, to follow with barking; to bring or drive
   to bay; as, to bay the bear. --Shak.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, n. [See Bay, v. i.]
   1. Deep-toned, prolonged barking. "The bay of curs."
      --Cowper.
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   2. [OE. bay, abay, OF. abai, F. aboi barking, pl. abois,
      prop. the extremity to which the stag is reduced when
      surrounded by the dogs, barking (aboyant); aux abois at
      bay.] A state of being obliged to face an antagonist or a
      difficulty, when escape has become impossible.
      [1913 Webster]

            Embolden'd by despair, he stood at bay. --Dryden.
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            The most terrible evils are just kept at bay by
            incessant efforts.                    --I. Taylor
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, n. [F. baie a berry, the fruit of the laurel and
   other trees, fr. L. baca, bacca, a small round fruit, a
   berry, akin to Lith. bapka laurel berry.]
   1. A berry, particularly of the laurel. [Obs.]
      [1913 Webster]

   2. The laurel tree (Laurus nobilis). Hence, in the plural,
      an honorary garland or crown bestowed as a prize for
      victory or excellence, anciently made or consisting of
      branches of the laurel.
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            The patriot's honors and the poet's bays.
                                                  --Trumbull.
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   3. A tract covered with bay trees. [Local, U. S.]
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   Bay leaf, the leaf of the bay tree (Laurus nobilis). It
      has a fragrant odor and an aromatic taste, and is used for
      flavoring in food.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, v. t. [Cf. OE. b[ae]wen to bathe, and G. b[aum]hen to
   foment.]
   To bathe. [Obs.] --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, n.
   A bank or dam to keep back water.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bay \Bay\, v. t.
   To dam, as water; -- with up or back.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

colorful \colorful\ adj.
   1. having striking color. Opposite of colorless.

   Note: [Narrower terms: {changeable, chatoyant, iridescent,
         shot}; deep, rich; flaming; fluorescent, glowing;
         prismatic; psychedelic; {red, ruddy, flushed,
         empurpled}]

   Syn: colourful.
        [WordNet 1.5]

   2. striking in variety and interest. Opposite of colorless
      or dull. [Narrower terms: brave, fine, gay, glorious;
      flamboyant, resplendent, unrestrained; {flashy, gaudy,
      jazzy, showy, snazzy, sporty}; picturesque]
      [WordNet 1.5]

   3. having color or a certain color; not black, white or grey;
      as, colored crepe paper. Opposite of colorless and
      monochrome.

   Note: [Narrower terms: tinted; touched, tinged; {amber,
         brownish-yellow, yellow-brown}; amethyst; {auburn,
         reddish-brown}; aureate, gilded, gilt, gold, golden;
         azure, cerulean, sky-blue, bright blue; {bicolor,
         bicolour, bicolored, bicoloured, bichrome}; {blue,
         bluish, light-blue, dark-blue}; {blushful,
         blush-colored, rosy}; bottle-green; bronze, bronzy;
         brown, brownish, dark-brown; buff; {canary,
         canary-yellow}; caramel, caramel brown; carnation;
         chartreuse; chestnut; dun; {earth-colored,
         earthlike}; fuscous; {green, greenish, light-green,
         dark-green}; jade, jade-green; khaki; {lavender,
         lilac}; mauve; moss green, mosstone; {motley,
         multicolor, culticolour, multicolored, multicoloured,
         painted, particolored, particoloured, piebald, pied,
         varicolored, varicoloured}; mousy, mouse-colored;
         ocher, ochre; olive-brown; olive-drab; olive;
         orange, orangish; peacock-blue; pink, pinkish;
         purple, violet, purplish; {red, blood-red, carmine,
         cerise, cherry, cherry-red, crimson, ruby, ruby-red,
         scarlet}; red, reddish; rose, roseate; rose-red;
         rust, rusty, rust-colored; {snuff, snuff-brown,
         snuff-color, snuff-colour, snuff-colored,
         snuff-coloured, mummy-brown, chukker-brown}; {sorrel,
         brownish-orange}; stone, stone-gray; {straw-color,
         straw-colored, straw-coloured}; tan; tangerine;
         tawny; ultramarine; umber; {vermilion,
         vermillion, cinibar, Chinese-red}; yellow, yellowish;
         yellow-green; avocado; bay; beige; {blae
         bluish-black or gray-blue)}; coral; creamy; {cress
         green, cresson, watercress}; hazel; {honey,
         honey-colored}; hued(postnominal); magenta;
         maroon; pea-green; russet; sage, sage-green;
         sea-green] [Also See: chromatic, colored, dark,
         light.]

   Syn: colored, coloured, in color(predicate).
        [WordNet 1.5]
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