executive


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Executive \Ex*ec"u*tive\, n.
   1. An impersonal title of the chief magistrate or officer who
      administers the government, whether king, president, or
      governor; the governing person or body.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. a person who has administrative authority over an
      organization or division of an organization; a manager,
      supervisor or administrator at a high level within an
      organization; as, all executives of the company were given
      stock options
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Executive \Ex*ec"u*tive\, a. [Cf.F. ex['e]cutif.]
   1. Designed or fitted for execution, or carrying into effect;
      as, executive talent; qualifying for, concerned with, or
      pertaining to, the execution of the laws or the conduct of
      affairs; as, executive power or authority; executive
      duties, officer, department, etc.
      [1913 Webster]

   Note: In government, executive is distinguished from
         legislative and judicial; legislative being
         applied to the organ or organs of government which make
         the laws; judicial, to that which interprets and
         applies the laws; executive, to that which carries them
         into effect or secures their due performance.
         [1913 Webster]

   2. of or pertaining to an executive[2] or to the group of
      executives within an organization; as, executive
      compensation increased more rapidly than wages in the
      1980's; the executive suite.
      [PJC]
Feedback Form