hip


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hip \Hip\, n. [OE. hipe, huppe, AS. hype; akin to D. heup, OHG.
   huf, G. h["u]fte, Dan. hofte, Sw. h["o]ft, Goth. hups; cf.
   Icel. huppr, and also Gr. ? the hollow above the hips of
   cattle, and Lith. kumpis ham.]
   [1913 Webster]
   1. The projecting region of the lateral parts of one side of
      the pelvis and the hip joint; the haunch; the huckle.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. (Arch.) The external angle formed by the meeting of two
      sloping sides or skirts of a roof, which have their wall
      plates running in different directions.
      [1913 Webster]

   3. (Engin) In a bridge truss, the place where an inclined end
      post meets the top chord. --Waddell.
      [1913 Webster]

   Hip bone (Anat.), the innominate bone; -- called also
      haunch bone and huckle bone.

   Hip girdle (Anat.), the pelvic girdle.

   Hip joint (Anat.), the articulation between the thigh bone
      and hip bone.

   Hip knob (Arch.), a finial, ball, or other ornament at the
      intersection of the hip rafters and the ridge.

   Hip molding (Arch.), a molding on the hip of a roof,
      covering the hip joint of the slating or other roofing.

   Hip rafter (Arch.), the rafter extending from the wall
      plate to the ridge in the angle of a hip roof.

   Hip roof, Hipped roof (Arch.), a roof having sloping ends
      and sloping sides. See Hip, n., 2., and Hip, v. t., 3.
      

   Hip tile, a tile made to cover the hip of a roof.

   To catch upon the hip, or To have on the hip, to have or
      get the advantage of; -- a figure probably derived from
      wresting. --Shak.

   To smite hip and thigh, to overthrow completely; to defeat
      utterly. --Judg. xv. 8.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hip \Hip\, interj.
   Used to excite attention or as a signal; as, hip, hip, hurra!
   Hip
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hip \Hip\, or Hipps \Hipps\, n.
   See Hyp, n. [Colloq.]
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

hip \hip\, a.
   1. Aware of the latest ideas, trends, fashions, and
      developments in popular music and entertainment culture;
      not square; -- same as hep.

   Syn: tuned in.
        [PJC]

   2. Aware of the latest fashions and behaving as expected
      socially, especially in clothing style and musical taste;
      exhibiting an air of casual sophistication; cool; with it;
      -- used mostly among young people in the teens to
      twenties.
      [PJC]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hip \Hip\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hipped; p. pr. & vb. n.
   Hipping.]
   1. To dislocate or sprain the hip of, to fracture or injure
      the hip bone of (a quadruped) in such a manner as to
      produce a permanent depression of that side.
      [1913 Webster]

   2. To throw (one's adversary) over one's hip in wrestling
      (technically called cross buttock).
      [1913 Webster]

   3. To make with a hip or hips, as a roof.
      [1913 Webster]

   Hipped roof. See Hip roof, under Hip.
      [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Hip \Hip\, n. [OE. hepe, AS. he['o]pe; cf. OHG. hiufo a bramble
   bush.] (Bot.)
   The fruit of a rosebush, especially of the English dog-rose
   (Rosa canina); called also rose hip. [Written also hop,
   hep.]
   [1913 Webster]

   Hip tree (Bot.), the dog-rose.
      [1913 Webster]
Feedback Form