inward


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Inward \In"ward\, n.
   1. That which is inward or within; especially, in the plural,
      the inner parts or organs of the body; the viscera. --Jer.
      Taylor.
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            Then sacrificing, laid the inwards and their fat.
                                                  --Milton.
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   2. The mental faculties; -- usually pl. [Obs.]
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   3. An intimate or familiar friend or acquaintance. [Obs.] "I
      was an inward of his." --Shak. Inward
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Inward \In"ward\, Inwards \In"wards\, adv. [AS. inweard. The
   ending -s is prop. a genitive ending. See Inward, a.,
   -wards.]
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   1. Toward the inside; toward the center or interior; as, to
      bend a thing inward.
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   2. Into, or toward, the mind or thoughts; inwardly; as, to
      turn the attention inward.
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            So much the rather, thou Celestial Light,
            Shine inward.                         --Milton.
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.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Inward \In"ward\ ([i^]n*w[~e]rd), a. [AS. inweard, inneweard,
   innanweard, fr. innan, inne, within (fr. in in; see In) +
   the suffix -weard, E. -ward.]
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   1. Being or placed within; inner; interior; -- opposed to
      outward. --Milton.
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   2. Seated in the mind, heart, spirit, or soul. "Inward
      beauty." --Shak.
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   3. Intimate; domestic; private. [Obs.]
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            All my inward friends abhorred me.    --Job xix. 19.
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            He had had occasion, by one very inward with him, to
            know in part the discourse of his life. --Sir P.
                                                  Sidney.
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