kinetoscope


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Kinetoscope \Ki*ne"to*scope\, n. [Originally a tradename, 1894.]
   An obsolete form of moving picture viewer, in which a film
   carrying successive instantaneous views of a moving scene
   travels uniformly through the field of a magnifying glass.
   The observer sees each picture, momentarily, through a slit
   in a revolving disk, and these glimpses, blended by
   persistence of vision, give the impression of continuous
   motion. It has been superseded by more recent versions of
   movie projector and electronic video viewers.
   [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

kinetoscope \ki*ne"to*scope\ (k[-i]*n[=e]`t[-o]*sk[=o]p; 277),
   n. [Gr. kinhto`s movable + -scope.]
   An instrument for producing curves by the combination of
   circular movements; -- called also kinescope. --Cope.
   [1913 Webster]
.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Cinematograph \Cin`e*mat"o*graph\, n. [Gr. ?, ?, motion +
   -graph.]
   1. an older name for a movie projector, a machine,
      combining magic lantern and kinetoscope features, for
      projecting on a screen a series of pictures, moved rapidly
      (25 to 50 frames per second) and intermittently before an
      objective lens, and producing by persistence of vision the
      illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture projector;
      also, any of several other machines or devices producing
      moving pictorial effects. Other older names for the {movie
      projector} are animatograph, biograph, bioscope,
      electrograph, electroscope, kinematograph,
      kinetoscope, veriscope, vitagraph, vitascope,
      zoogyroscope, zoopraxiscope, etc.

            The cinematograph, invented by Edison in 1894, is
            the result of the introduction of the flexible film
            into photography in place of glass.   --Encyc. Brit.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

   2. A camera for taking chronophotographs for exhibition by
      the instrument described above.
      [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
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