leet


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pollack \Pol"lack\, n. [Cf. G. & D. pollack, and Gael. pollag a
   little pool, a sort of fish.] (Zool.)
   (a) A marine gadoid food fish of Europe ({Pollachius
       virens}). Called also greenfish, greenling, lait,
       leet, lob, lythe, and whiting pollack.
   (b) The American pollock; the coalfish.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Leet \Leet\ (l[=e]t), obs. imp.
   of Let, to allow. --Chaucer.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Leet \Leet\, n. [Cf. AS. hl[=e]t share, lot.]
   A portion; a list, esp. a list of candidates for an office.
   [Scot.]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Leet \Leet\, n. [LL. leta. Cf. F. lit de justice a solemn
   sitting of the king in Parliament, L. lis, litis, a lawsuit,
   It., Sp., & Pg. lite.] (Eng. Hist.)
   A court-leet; the district within the jurisdiction of a
   court-leet; the day on which a court-leet is held. --Shak.
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   Note: The original intent of the court-leet was to view the
         frankpledges or freemen within the liberty; hence
         called the view of frankpledge. Latterly it has fallen
         into almost entire disuse. --Burrill. Warren's
         Blackstone.
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   Leet ale, a feast or merrymaking in time of leet. [Obs.]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Leet \Leet\, n. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Zool.)
   The European pollock.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lythe \Lythe\ (l[imac]th), n. (Zool.)
   The European pollack; -- called also laith, and leet.
   [Scot.]
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