lob


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pollack \Pol"lack\, n. [Cf. G. & D. pollack, and Gael. pollag a
   little pool, a sort of fish.] (Zool.)
   (a) A marine gadoid food fish of Europe ({Pollachius
       virens}). Called also greenfish, greenling, lait,
       leet, lob, lythe, and whiting pollack.
   (b) The American pollock; the coalfish.
       [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pollock \Pol"lock\, n. [See Pollack.] (Zool.)
   A marine gadoid fish (Pollachius carbonarius), native both
   of the European and American coasts. It is allied to the cod,
   and like it is salted and dried. In England it is called
   coalfish, lob, podley, podling, pollack, etc.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lob \Lob\ (l[o^]b), n. [W. llob an unwieldy lump, a dull fellow,
   a blockhead. Cf. Looby, Lubber.]
   1. A dull, heavy person. " Country lobs." --Gauden.
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   2. Something thick and heavy.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lob \Lob\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lobbed (l[o^]bd); p. pr. & vb.
   n. Lobbing.]
   2. To let fall heavily or lazily.
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            And their poor jades
            Lob down their heads.                 --Shak.
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   2. to propel (relatively slowly) in a high arcing trajectory;
      as, to lob a grenade at the enemy.
      [PJC]

   To lob a ball (Lawn Tennis), to strike a ball so as to send
      it up into the air.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lob \Lob\, v. t. (Mining)
   See Cob, v. t.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lob \Lob\, n. [Dan. lubbe.] (Zool.)
   The European pollock.
   [1913 Webster]
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lob \Lob\, n.
   The act of lobbing; specif., an (often gentle) stroke which
   sends a ball up into the air, as in tennis to avoid a player
   at the net.
   [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
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