past


From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Past \Past\, prep.
   1. Beyond, in position, or degree; further than; beyond the
      reach or influence of. "Who being past feeling." --Eph.
      iv. 19. "Galled past endurance." --Macaulay.
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            Until we be past thy borders.         --Num. xxi.
                                                  22.
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            Love, when once past government, is consequently
            past shame.                           --L'Estrange.
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   2. Beyond, in time; after; as, past the hour.
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            Is it not past two o'clock?           --Shak.
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   3. Above; exceeding; more than. [R.]
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            Not past three quarters of a mile.    --Shak.
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            Bows not past three quarters of a yard long.
                                                  --Spenser.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Past \Past\, a. [From Pass, v.]
   Of or pertaining to a former time or state; neither present
   nor future; gone by; elapsed; ended; spent; as, past
   troubles; past offences. "Past ages." --Milton.
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   Past master. See under Master.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Past \Past\, n.
   A former time or state; a state of things gone by. "The past,
   at least, is secure." --D. Webster.
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         The present is only intelligible in the light of the
         past, often a very remote past indeed.   --Trench.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Past \Past\ (p[.a]st), adv.
   By; beyond; as, he ran past.
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         The alarum of drums swept past.          --Longfellow.
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